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COVID-19 update: Health dept. reports 4 new cases reported Friday in Nelson Co.

NC GAZETTE / WBRT RADIO
STAFF REPORT

Friday, July 10, 2020 — Four new COVID-19 cases were confirmed Friday in Nelson County by the Lincoln Trail District Health Department.

According to local sources, the new cases include:

  • a 21-year-old Cox’s Creek man;
  • a 20-year-old Bardstown woman;
  • a 60-year-old Balltown area woman;
  • a 38-year-old Bardstown man.

The new cases bring Nelson County’s COVID-19 case total to 109. Twenty-eight people are isolated at home, and one person is hospitalized. Seventy-eight people have recovered.

Additional COVID-19 cases were reported Friday in Hardin, Marion, Meade and Washington counties.

MARION COUNTY. Two new COVID-19 cases were reported Friday in Marion County, bringing the county’s case total to 60. Eleven people are on home isolation, and 49 have recovered.

WASHINGTON COUNTY. One new COVID-19 case was reported Friday in Washington County, bringing the county’s case total to 25. Three people are on home isolation. Two people are hospitalized, and 20 people have recovered.

HARDIN COUNTY. Nine new COVID-19 cases were reported Friday in Hardin County, bringing the county’s case total to 245. Three people are hospitalized as of Friday afternoon. Fifty-seven are currently isolated at home and 180 have recovered.

MEADE COUNTY. One new COVID-19 case was reported Friday in Meade County, bringing the county’s case total to 37. Six people remain isolated at home, and 29 have recovered.

LARUE COUNTY. No new cases were reported Friday in LaRue County. The county’s COVID-19 case total stands at 20. One person is isolated at home, and 18 have recovered.

LINCOLN TRAIL DISTRICT. A total of 17 new cases were reported in the six-county Lincoln Trail District on Friday, bringing the district total to 496 cases. Six people in the district are hospitalized. A total of 106 people are isolated at home; 374 have recovered. There have been a total of 10 deaths in the district.

MASKS REQUIRED. The number of COVID-19 cases across the United States has exceeded 3 million. On July 9th alone, more than 64,000 individuals were diagnosed with the virus. Due to the alarming rise in cases, many states have opted to institute mandatory preventive measures to assist in slowing the spread of COVID-19. Kentucky is no exception.

On Thursday, Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear announced that beginning 5 p.m. today, all Kentuckians will be required to wear masks in the following situations:

• While inside or waiting in line to enter any indoor public space in which a physical distance of six feet or more cannot be maintained from the next person. Examples of these types of public spaces include, but are not limited to retail establishments, grocery stores, pharmacies, hair salons, barber shops, restaurants, and health care settings.

• Outdoor public places where a physical distance of six feet cannot be maintained from the next person. Enforcement of the new mandate and the role health departments will play has not yet been determined.

A growing body of research indicates that face coverings, even homemade masks, can reduce the spread of COVID-19. This is true not only for the wearer, but for those around them as well. Yet, all face coverings are not equal when it comes to protection. A recent study by Oxford University revealed that loosely woven fabrics, such as scarves have been shown to be the least beneficial. Multilayered masks made of a combination of materials (e.g. cotton, silk), that fit snugly against the face with no gaping and that allow for comfortable breathing without restriction, are the most effective in preventing the spread of COVID-19.

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